Camp Williams

Saying No

Corporate Stress

 

Camp Williams

Nancy had an incredible opportunity this year (September 2005) to assist in activities at Camp Williams, by volunteering with the Red Cross, to help in relocation efforts of those affected by Hurricane Katrina.  There were individuals from all walks of life at Camp Williams:  from children to retirees, many ethnic backgrounds, and from disabled people to licensed professionals.  All were focused on starting over, finding a place to live, and reconnecting with family (some of whom were also relocated temporarily to elsewhere in the country).  Imagine not even having any form of identification, no transportation, no belongings, no job, and no bank account or credit cards.  How would you reach family members, hundreds of miles away, if you didn*t have their phone numbers or addresses?  Some people were grateful for something as simple as getting help with making a phone call!

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Saying No

In September (2005), the Ogden Standard-Examiner quoted Nancy, in an article by Rachel J. Trotter, titled: ※In the Workplace, Saying No Isn*t End Of the World§.  One of the things Nancy discussed with the author was to practice checking your comfort level and priorities before saying ※yes§ or ※no§ 每 instead of after.  Reviewing new requests along with other priorities helps us better evaluate what is most important.  If we assess a new request as a stand-alone item, ※yes§ slips in more easily and we may end up taking on too much.  We often say ※yes§ to please others.  Saying ※no§ causes tension.  It*s easy to negotiate priorities at work 每 just ask what it is that your boss wants done first.  Negotiation can happen at home too 每 perhaps a new request can get scheduled in later, when you will have more time.  Remember that your time and energy is just as important as others*.  Set realistic time lines, save time for recharging, and prioritize to keep stress low.

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Corporate Stress

Nancy spoke on ※Corporate Stress Management§ at the Top Of Utah Business Expo in October (2005).  One of the key points of this talk was to begin with the end in mind.  It*s hard to chart a course if you don*t know where you*re going.  Defining your end goal is the beginning of a plan.  Once we have a set destination we can look for interference, and map out our route to avoid or reduce the stressors 每 before they affect our health.  Stress is something that can get in our way; it slows us down and makes the trip bumpier.  Imagine you are a pilot and stress is an approaching storm, how would you prepare?  If we focus only on the storm instead of the final destination 每 we may not make it.  Negativity is like adding water to our fuel 每 our engine will just sputter and spit, eventually conking out before getting where we really want to go.  Focus on staying positive and go around the storms!

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